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What makes a good BBQ video?


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Hi all,

I've just uploaded my first BBQ video to YouTube and whilst I didn't invest anything more than my time in the production value, I did want to try my best to make something that people wanted to watch and would be useful. Whether I ticked those boxes, only time will tell, but it got me thinking... What makes a good BBQ video?

I watch a lot of videos on YouTube and it seems to be a combination of:

1. Personality - if you don't resonate with the person you're watching, it can be quite difficult to stay engaged
2. Production quality - bad camera skills make it hard to watch videos as opposed to clear, well-lit videos that are really helpful
3. Content - It doesn't matter if you're a skilled cook, if I'm not getting the information in an easy-to-listen/watch format then I probably won't watch the video until the end

So what do you think makes a good BBQ video?

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Me personally I prefer written instructions on the screen whilst watching it being prepared and cooked, showing the ingredient quantities and  internal temp and approx cooking times and temps and at the end of it summarise it all so I can pause it, whilst preparing it myself and not have to skip to 6 different parts of the video to complete what they have done..

I don't want to listen to the person waffling on endlessly for 13 minutes of a 15 minute video. Just give me the basics and what I need.

My preference, sure not everybody else's though.But  I have an attention span of 2-3 minutes  anything longer and I switch off or skip to the end. 😀

 

p.s. this is not a criticism of your video, just expressing how I prefer to watch videoes on youtube myself  in general. As per your question

Edited by sotv
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I agree with @sotv what really pee's me off are the "intro's"  some are up to 2 mins long of weird music,  graphics, before anything gets going.

What does stand out on some of the video's is the camera work, I video (like a lot of folks) and one thing I did read about using a vid camera is "Panning".


When you're holding the camera either up to your eye or using the camera screen,  you pan, but when it's on replay what's normal to you while holding is not on replay it's too fast.
Setting up a camera on a tripod like you did at the start prepping the ribs was spot on...then you go outside to the kettle the camera is a little "all over the place",  but the great thing about this is your asking what the guys need,  well done you.
 
Ice.  m0121.gif

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Visually the video was fine in my book, in the sense that nothing annoyed me overly, I think it could've been improved but overall not a bad first attempt.  Biggest issues for me were the dead air space moments which just takes you out of the moment and i don't feel like the visual aspect was strong enough during the silent points to keep me engrossed.  

In terms of overall feedback I think I prefer when the presenter is part of the video as it allows the personality to show more and feels more personal rather than a documentary style like this.

In terms of content I watch regularly good examples are things like guga foods, sam the cooking guy and Bbq with Franklin.

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1 hour ago, sotv said:

Me personally I prefer written instructions on the screen whilst watching it being prepared and cooked, showing the ingredient quantities and  internal temp and approx cooking times and temps and at the end of it summarise it all so I can pause it, whilst preparing it myself and not have to skip to 6 different parts of the video to complete what they have done..

I don't want to listen to the person waffling on endlessly for 13 minutes of a 15 minute video. Just give me the basics and what I need.

My preference, sure not everybody else's though.But  I have an attention span of 2-3 minutes  anything longer and I switch off or skip to the end. 😀

 

p.s. this is not a criticism of your video, just expressing how I prefer to watch videoes on youtube myself  in general. As per your question

That's some really useful information - it's my first video so I'm okay with making 'mistakes' but I'll definitely need to learn how to cut them down and how to add some nice text to them. I also can't watch more than a 2-3 minutes unless I'm watching someone like Harry Soo or Aaron Franklin!

1 hour ago, Icefever said:

I agree with @sotv what really pee's me off are the "intro's"  some are up to 2 mins long of weird music,  graphics, before anything gets going.

What does stand out on some of the video's is the camera work, I video (like a lot of folks) and one thing I did read about using a vid camera is "Panning".


When you're holding the camera either up to your eye or using the camera screen,  you pan, but when it's on replay what's normal to you while holding is not on replay it's too fast.
Setting up a camera on a tripod like you did at the start prepping the ribs was spot on...then you go outside to the kettle the camera is a little "all over the place",  but the great thing about this is your asking what the guys need,  well done you.
 
Ice.  m0121.gif

It's funny, I didn't realise at the time how 'wobbly' it was but it doesn't look great to me either! I'll have to find somewhere to attach my little tripod to in the garden. :) Thanks so much for the advice.

 

50 minutes ago, Montyb82 said:

Visually the video was fine in my book, in the sense that nothing annoyed me overly, I think it could've been improved but overall not a bad first attempt.  Biggest issues for me were the dead air space moments which just takes you out of the moment and i don't feel like the visual aspect was strong enough during the silent points to keep me engrossed.  

In terms of overall feedback I think I prefer when the presenter is part of the video as it allows the personality to show more and feels more personal rather than a documentary style like this.

In terms of content I watch regularly good examples are things like guga foods, sam the cooking guy and Bbq with Franklin.

I'm not opposed to showing my face so I'll definitely have to think of a good way of doing that. Thanks for the examples, I'll definitely check them out!

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38 minutes ago, allyby58 said:

Looks to me you would benefit getting a larger BBQ, Is that a 47cm kettle? if so go up to a 57cm for cooking that amount of food.

I wouldn't disagree - it was not bought with the intention of smoking so I've got my eye on a WSM or Pit Barrel Cooker! The Aldi kamado's look great too.

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This is a subject close to my heart, as I have started to make videos and had some feed back from Forum Members.

And in conclusion, you are not going to please everyone!

Some want talking with full instructions and some prefer basic video.

Lenght of Video is another stumbling block. I agree with folks, you do not want some bloke rambling on how to set up the BBQ every time he cooks, one video on how to set up, then stick to the cook in hand. Also 20 - 25 minutes long, I am board by then, and moved on. Any thing over 5 minutes, has lost me.

I would prefer not to talk on my videos, live or dubbed over the top, why? I have the perfect voice for insomniacs!

Do I want to appear on my videos? No! Go the perfect face for Radio.

I have set up a two Website and YouTube Channels.

For BBQ and Low & Slow, Hot Coals BBQ and YouTube

For Dutch Oven, Cast Iron and Live Fire Cooking, Dutchy Cooking and also a YouTube Channel Dutchy Cooking

My Dutch Oven Channel, I wanted that air of mystery, about the person behind it, Banksie style. I about the cooking and food not the person.

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Here are my thoughts:

1. Sound quality. If the sound is bad and I can't really hear you properly, forget it. I'm switching off.

2. Video quality. As with sound, if it looks bad, poor resolution/frame rate, forget it.

3. Length. Less is always more! I've seen so many videos dragged out over 10 minutes when they could easily be trimmed to 3-4 minutes. No prolonged intros, don't tease with the title and then not answer it until 8 minutes in. I used to work for a drinks retailer and we produced half-a-dozen Christmas videos on how to open Champagne, how to make mulled wine etc - they were all 2 mins max (based on the advice of our in-house videographer). We watched some others to compare, and by 4-5 mins we were soooooo bored. 

4. Graphics/subtitles are always a benefit. Not too much - your video shouldn't look like a late-90s website with flashing icons all over the place, but well-chosen graphics can work wonders. I watch a lot of golf stuff on YouTube and the best YouTubers use graphics really well.

5. I don't think you necessarily need your face in the video ie it's not a dealbreaker. I watch Gugu Foods and some of his best videos don't have his face in.

6. Charisma is everything. If you don't warm to the person making/narrating the video, forget it. But if you don't have it, there's not much you can do about it!

7. With reference to your video, I like your use of speeding up the footage. That works really well (I would go even quicker, personally!). 

Will have a proper look/listen tonight. And good luck!

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It looks like everyone has given you good advice on here. My little penny’s worth is this. 

Look at what’s popular, How to BBQ right, FoodTube, Pitmaster etc, the one thing that is constant is the production value. Don’t skimp on this as it is probably the most important. You could have the best recipe in the world but if the sound is poor and the camera wobbles then people will turn away. 

Personality is an important aspect again if you’re like a board then people will turn off. Remember to try to keep smiling when you’re talking as it gives your voice a more upbeat tone. 

Personally I like the ingredients to flash on the video as well as any important information, but that is totally personal and I know it isn’t for everyone. 

Good luck and keep it going. 

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I'd usually respond individually but I'm overwhelmed with advice and it's all brilliant so allow me to say thank you to everyone who responded. This isn't meant as a plug, but I took some of the advice and cut down the video, added some text and ran off a much more rigid script. There's plenty of room for improvement, but here's the video for anyone's who interested. I'm not necessarily looking for more feedback (although it's always welcome) but just want to prove that I'm taking the advice and I hope that further videos will continue to be better!

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