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Cured Bacon Storage


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Need advice please.

I cured some bacon for 10 days which finished on Tuesday. Its been washed and left on a rack in the fridge to dry before smoking. Unfortunately I was unable to smoke it when I intended to so its still in the refrigerator. I would like to smoke it tomorrow but was wondering if its been there too long (4 days) its not wrapped. Is there a cut off time for leaving cured bacon in the fridge before smoking. Thank You folks.

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  • 1 year later...

My first go at dry cured pork belly has air dried for 24hrs and had a couple of slices off the end for taste testing. Should I now slice up the lot, portion and freeze? Its currently unwrapped in the fridge. 

Edited by Eddie
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To slice, or not to slice?? ok I won't say the rest...😆...I've been curing bacon for a couple of years, to start with I would cut the slab into small sections into a size that you can use without wasting any.
From the start of this year, I've gone back to using the machine, the reason being is when a piece was taken from the freezer you have to wait until it's softened enough to use a knife.
Most times I would miss it and by the time I got around to slicing it, it would be too soft to be able to cut decent slices.
I find even straight from the fridge is not firm enough, that's why I now use the machine, count out 8 slices and vac-pack.

One point to take on board thou is unsliced will last a little longer in the fridge in a block..but ours is never around that long to survive 🤣

Also I leave the bcon (air dry) in the fridge for 48 hours.

 

Ice.

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Good advice from Ice. The bacon will store longer in the fridge if it is uncut, but if you don't think you will eat it all over 4 weeks or so then you will need to freeze some.

Unlike @Icefever (aka "gadget man" 😁) you may not have access to slicers and vacuum packers so below is how you can achieve similar results...

If you don't have a slicer, put the bacon in the freezer for about an hour to get it to firm up (but not freeze) and then slice as thinly as you need it with the sharpest knife you have. The sharper the knife the more successful the slicing will be. If you don't have a vacuum packer then, once sliced, place in zip locked plastic bags, removing as much of the air as you can before sealing and freezing. Freeze in batches that you will be able to use in about a week.

Don't forget to save the saltier end slices and any offcuts to use as lardons. They can be cut into small chunks and frozen in individual use portions.

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So I'm clear, approx 4 weeks with slicing rashers off as needed, otherwise freeze the defrost and use within a week.

In terms of storage before slicing and freezing should it be wrapped, in a container or open in the fridge?

 

Bacon tastes amazing, so much better than supermarket stuff, I don't usually like green bacon but I like this stuff.

20210328_080600.jpg

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4 hours ago, Eddie said:

So I'm clear, approx 4 weeks with slicing rashers off as needed, otherwise freeze the defrost and use within a week.

Yes. All fridges behave slightly different though and so you will need to use your judgement towards the end. Bacon is going to be cooked before eating, you have applied two different bacterial controls (salt and nitrite), and you are going to keep it refrigerated, and by keeping it as a block you are minimising it's surface area.

4 hours ago, Eddie said:

In terms of storage before slicing and freezing should it be wrapped, in a container or open in the fridge.

It should be wrapped in the fridge. Keep it in the zip locked bag with as much air removed as possible.

4 hours ago, Eddie said:

Bacon tastes amazing, so much better than supermarket stuff, I don't usually like green bacon but I like this stuff.

That is great to hear. Making your first batch is always the most stressful and now you will have the confidence to experiment further. Advice I will give is to keep a book to document everything you do. This will help you remember each batch, what you have changed, anything that went wrong and how you overcame it. This will help you to produce consistent batches as you move forward.

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