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Which end ??


Icefever
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13 hours ago, Wade said:

I find that immersion cured (supermarket) bacon works best for the fatties as it is more pliable/stretchy and moulds round the meat better than the drier dry-cure bacon. Give it a try though and see how you get on.

A bit of general info - Dry cure bacon will last up to 6 weeks when kept as a lump (I.e. unsliced), vac packed and in the fridge. Once you slice the bacon it should be used within a week - unless it is then frozen.

I use that as well, Not so easy to find these days. But I use Rind on streaky bacon, for the fattys as well, as they seem to make a slightly stronger bacon weave for me and the rind softens up to nothing after a 6 hour slow cook anyway.

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19 hours ago, sotv said:

rind softens up to nothing after a 6 hour slow cook anyway.

We've only done 2 fatties so far,  we will be doing another one today,  the other two we went via the inkbird thermometer if I remember stopped cooking at 70c.  Total cooking time was around 3 hours for both....now my question about your slow cook of 6 hours....what was the temperature??

I used the Brickman for the last two which seemed easy to work with because of the smaller cooking surface, and the fatties were sat on top of the heat.

Today I'm using the offset Landmann, for the fattie, skewers, jackets and other bits.  For a slow cook do I start the fattie at the hot end for a short time then slide to the cooler end?? or go straight on to the cooler end?.   ?  (I think I know the answer but I want to make sure as it's for a party of eight    ?

Edited by Icefever
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Can't help with an offset I am afraid. I use a ProQ (Bullet Smoker like the Brinkmann) I take pork and poultry ones up to 80c (180F) for my tastes. If taking them to someones else house I would take them off at 70c as they would once, foiled carry on cooking, whilst being transported. 70c should be fine as a finished cooking temp, whatever suits your tastes.Wade know more about minimum finished cooking temps than me though.

Interested that you can get it done in 3 hours. Never had a pork or chicken one cook quicker than 5 and half hours and usually another 1 hour on top for me for me at a constant 225F on my bullet smoker, with a full water pan. But would imagine the thickness of the ingredients inside the weave can have a big bearing on that, as well as the internal temperature you like?

 

 

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Thinking about it I'm sure the IT was around 74c as per Steve J recipe, the strange thing about the timings...because I read 3 hours somewhere.

Well, we're getting everything ready for today, full sun all day, just been down to Lidl and picked up a couple of samples of cheese.

The thickness of the ingredients inside we try to keep to the same size, the chicken is cut to match the thickness of the mince....just seems to be a safe way of doing it.

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As you are using mainly ready ground meat or chicken in the fatttys there is no real point in cooking them low-and-slow. To begin with I used to spend the longer time cooking them but then one day I was forced to cook one in a hurry and I found that they cook just as well hot roasted at 160-180 C. I now cook all of mine at this temperature and they only take about an hour to reach 75-80 C. 

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The reason for me Lo & Slo cooking mine, is I just have the one ProQ, and unless cooking for me and my wife, I tend to cook multiple different items together, when cooking for a group that also cook lo & slo at the same time.

Realise I could BBQ it indirectly, but everything done in one unit for me, just makes it easier to cope with and a little less messy and tbh I haven't used my kettle BBQ for nearly 2 full summers now...

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I do all my cold and lo & slo smoking in my Proq, along with general BBQing, cooking pizza's, fish & shellfish at low cooking temperatures. The only thing my particular model can't do for my outdoor cooking needs is rotisserie chicken. (hence the purchase of a Jumbuck) the Proq model up from mine can add a rotisserie accessory though. Haven't had the need for a kettle BBQ for the last 2 summers, tbh. Found I can cater for up to 12 people for most types of cooking with just the ProQ, without the need for the kettle BBQ.

I may be tempted by an outdoor paella maker next year. The idea of smoked pork belly burnt ends along with some smoked shellfish (prawns, mussels and crab claws), straight off the Proq onto a paella pan, with the rice already cooked in chicken stock and some of the pork drippings along with green and red peppers, onion and Valencia paella spice mix appeals to me. 

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