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Mushroom Burgers - high tec


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It can be a challenge trying to fill your days during the pandemic lockdown, however if you are looking for something different to try and are at a loss as to what to do with all that "meat glue" that you have left in your fridge, then I have the perfect thing for you - High Tec Mushroom Burgers.

The base recipe for these came from a chefs forum that I can highly recommend - www.chefsteps.com

Take 1.5 Kg of mushrooms (I used a tray of Portobello mushrooms from Bookers), clean thoroughly and bake in an oven for 20 minutes at 190 C. After roasting, the mushrooms will begin to shrivel and release their liquid.

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Blend the mushrooms and press out the liquid

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Add in 10g of salt and 8g of Yeast Flakes. The yeast flakes give a savoury, almost cheesy, flavour. I use this as a flavour enhancer rather than the MSG that the original recipe states. Mix well.

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Now for the "high tec" bit...

Combine 50g of Sodium Caseinate and 50g of Transglutaminase (meat glue) together in a separate bowl and mix thoroughly. Ttransglutaminase is a naturally occurring enzyme and works by creating a bond between two types of protein, glutamine and lysine. It is widely used in the cooked meat trade to create large joints out of smaller pieces of meat. Mushrooms also contain both glutamine and lysine and so the transglutaminase works in the same way. The sodium caseinate helps to enhance the effectiveness of the "glue".

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Add the sodium caseinate and Transglutaminase mix to the mushrooms and mix well. The mixture will get quite stiff.

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Place on clingfilm and mold into a cylinder shape. Roll into a sausage. The diameter of the sausage should be the diameter of the final mushroom burger patty.

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After you have formed the roll with 3 layers of wrap, use a tooth pick to prick out any air bubbles under the wrap. Continue to roll another 4 layers of wrap before tying the ends with string.

Place in the fridge for 24 hours to allow the meat glue to work its magic.

Cook in a water bath at 65 C for one hour. If you have a Sous Vide then this is the perfect time to use it. If the mushroom sausage floats then use something heavy to keep it submerged. Here I am using a pair of BBQ tongs.

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Allow to chill thoroughly in the fridge and then unwrap.

Slice into individual burger patties. These can be frozen for later use.

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Cook as you would a normal meat burger and serve

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A lovely mushroomy burger that will delight your vegetarian guests

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Transglutaminase (or "Meat Glue") is a common ingredient in processed foods. It allows manufacturers to take smaller off-cut pieces of meat that would probably be wasted and re-form them into larger, more practical size joints. It is also used to create novel combinations of meat. If you have eaten any of the deli-counter, perfectly round, sliced ham, or the pre-packed squares of sliced ham then they almost certainly contains meat glue. It is not only confined to gluing together meat. It can glue most foods that contain sufficient quantities of glutamine and lysine.

What It's Used For

  • Makes "steaks" out of glued together meat chunks.
  • Makes imitation crab meat, chicken nuggets, and fish balls.
  • Creates reconstituted steaks, fillets, roasts, and cutlets.
  • Makes uniform meat portions that cook evenly and reduce waste.
  • Binds meat mixtures (sausages, hot dogs) without using casings.
  • Improves mouth feel, water retention, and appearance of processed meats.
  • Makes novel meat combinations like lamb and scallops or bacon and beef.
  • Makes meat noodles (shrimp noodles) and other cuisine oddities.
  • For use in molecular gastronomy.
  • Thickens egg yolks.
  • Strengthens dough mixtures.
  • Thickens dairy products (yogurt, cheese.)
  • Increases yield in tofu production.

In the US and EU/UK Transglutaminase is not considered an ingredient as it will already be naturally present in most foods containing meat. It therefore does not to be included in the ingredients list on food labeling. It is instead classed as a "processing aid". If it is present you will usually find the words "formed" or "re-formed" on the label.

image.jpeg.af527271fb23aab417423674d0949fed.jpegimage.jpeg.9f4a5bc0f88f7047463916ca356793ec.jpegimage.jpeg.c7a373cff4295d65c115cce3f237b5f6.jpegDeli Meat | Cooking Momofuku at home - Momofuku for twoimage.jpeg.a110d2bc9805edb7a63a92c95c64698d.jpegimage.jpeg.0c367f2ac46bd54056ed40af37f6a568.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Wade said:

Transglutaminase (or "Meat Glue") is a common ingredient in processed foods. It allows manufacturers to take smaller off-cut pieces of meat that would probably be wasted and re-form them into larger, more practical size joints. It is also used to create novel combinations of meat. If you have eaten any of the deli-counter, perfectly round, sliced ham, or the pre-packed squares of sliced ham then they almost certainly contains meat glue. It is not only confined to gluing together meat. It can glue most foods that contain sufficient quantities of glutamine and lysine.

What It's Used For

  • Makes "steaks" out of glued together meat chunks.
  • Makes imitation crab meat, chicken nuggets, and fish balls.
  • Creates reconstituted steaks, fillets, roasts, and cutlets.
  • Makes uniform meat portions that cook evenly and reduce waste.
  • Binds meat mixtures (sausages, hot dogs) without using casings.
  • Improves mouth feel, water retention, and appearance of processed meats.
  • Makes novel meat combinations like lamb and scallops or bacon and beef.
  • Makes meat noodles (shrimp noodles) and other cuisine oddities.
  • For use in molecular gastronomy.
  • Thickens egg yolks.
  • Strengthens dough mixtures.
  • Thickens dairy products (yogurt, cheese.)
  • Increases yield in tofu production.

In the US and EU/UK Transglutaminase is not considered an ingredient as it will already be naturally present in most foods containing meat. It therefore does not to be included in the ingredients list on food labeling. It is instead classed as a "processing aid". If it is present you will usually find the words "formed" or "re-formed" on the label.

image.jpeg.af527271fb23aab417423674d0949fed.jpegimage.jpeg.9f4a5bc0f88f7047463916ca356793ec.jpegimage.jpeg.c7a373cff4295d65c115cce3f237b5f6.jpegDeli Meat | Cooking Momofuku at home - Momofuku for twoimage.jpeg.a110d2bc9805edb7a63a92c95c64698d.jpegimage.jpeg.0c367f2ac46bd54056ed40af37f6a568.jpeg

Great explanation thank you.

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