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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/19/2021 in all areas

  1. So, I've been looking for a heat resistant table or similar to go with the Big Joe, where I can place hot ceramic straight from the BBQ without having to worry about burning wood, paint etc. Its outside and not under cover, I didn't see anything cheap and suitable, so made my own. Started with a whisky barrel from Gumtree, £35 and £10 delivered (worth paying for delivery, they are heavy, unstable and dirty, not a good combination for the boot of your car), sanded it back, couple of coats of yacht varnish, masked off and painted the bands with some exterior black gloss. Finally topped it off with a concrete stepping stone from B&Q, cost £9. So for about £80 all in (including materials) I have something that is practical, heatproof, will last forever ( these old whisky barrels are bombproof), and looks the business. The stepping stone was a perfect fit, I screwed some batons onto the top of the barrel so there wasn't a void space under the stepping stone and used a silicone sealant/adhesive to stick it down and seal it on.
    2 points
  2. I use a little plant pot to drag mine into then chuck it into the soil.
    1 point
  3. I use the ProQ charcoal basket so I can lift the basket out and shake it over a wheelie bin to get the ash off the big pieces of charcoal that are left and lose the tiny pieces then I clean the inside of the kamado with an ash hoover. Makes the job easy and takes a few minutes.
    1 point
  4. I tried this yesterday took the temperature to 205f. Wrapped in foil around 144f and it was tender and pulled apart. I used the same rub i have used many times so now need to find a great rub for it. Thanks for the temperature recommendation.
    1 point
  5. There's not a lot to see. I'm using a 30cm wide under-counter wine fridge (for now), so space is a bit tight. The white cable is the mains supply and the fridge door closes onto it (slightly compressing the door seal), so I haven't had to make any holes or permanent alteration to the fridge. It terminates in one half of an in-line connector, and the other side is connected to the power in wires to the controller. It has two pairs of switched power out wires (one for temperature control and the other for humidity control). The temperature control is not currently required (because I can set the fridge's thermostat, directly), so both pairs run to a female three pin outlet (with the temperature control pair safely terminated, inside). The dehumidifier has its power supply/transformer plugged in to the outlet and the only control on the dehumidifier (an on/off switch) is left permanently 'on', so that the controller takes over the switching function. Operation is simple. The desired humidity range (min to max) can be set in increments of 0.1%. I currently have it cutting in at 75% and dropping out again at 70%. The sensor is connected to the controller via another cable and can be placed anywhere within 1.5m of the controller. So far, there is only a tiny bit of water in the dehumidifier (but the weather has been warm and dry), but if I watch the controller, I can see that the RH occasionally gets to 75%+, and then the dehumidifier runs for a minute or two to bring it back to 70% before cutting out again. The RH overshoots (presumably due to the lag in the sensor measurement) but only slightly, but the RH soon creeps up again (within a minute or so) back to within my chosen range. If the setup proves durable I'll probably look for a 2nd hand larder fridge that I can adapt as a more ambitious project. I'll connect the fridge compressor to the controller for temperature control (overriding the built-in thermostat) and probably drill small holes through the rear to keep the cables out of sight/tidy. I've spent £50 on the controller and dehumidifier, and the whole project might give me change out of £100 if I find a suitable fridge. The second picture is of the small piece of rolled pancetta that has been drying for 10 days. It is at just under 85% of the original weight, so about half way to my 70% target. It is ready to have the strings retied to keep the roll tight.
    1 point
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